LOGO

Transportation Curriculum Coordination Council

Quality Training For A Qualified Workforce
FHWA Home  |  Feedback

Search FHWA:
Subnavigation

Business Plan

Transportation Curriculum Coordination Council

www.nhi.fhwa.dot.gov/tccc

Co-owners of the TCCC Business Plan

Federal Highway Administration
National Highway Institute
American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Standing Committee on Highways
Subcommittee on Construction
Subcommittee on Maintenance
Subcommittee on Materials
State Highway Administrations/Departments of Transportation
Regional Technician Certification Groups
New England Transportation Technician Certification Program (NETTCP)
Mid-Atlantic Region Technician Certification Program (MARTCP)
Southeast Task Force on Technician Training and Certification (SETFTTQ)
North Central Multi-Regional Training and Certification Program (M-TRAC)
Western Alliance for Quality Transportation Construction (WAQTC)

The TCCC recognizes the vested interest that industry has in training and qualification programs. Examples of such partner organizations include:

  • American Concrete Pavement Association (ACPA)
  • American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA)
  • American Traffic Safety Services Association (ATSSA)
  • The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC)
  • Association of Drilled Shaft Contractors (ADSC)
  • Foundation for Pavement Preservation (FP2)
  • National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA)
  • National LTAP Association
  • National Ready Mixed Concrete Association (NRMCA)
  • National Institute for Certification of Engineering Technologies (NICET)
  • National Partnership for Highway Quality (NPHQ)

Contact: Christopher Newman, TCCC Program Manager
Federal Highway Administration Office of Asset Management
(202) 366-2023 / christopher.newman@fhwa.dot.gov

Acknowledgments

Special thanks to the following for their contributions to the TCCC Business Plan:

Bill Beuter
Construction Training Manager
VDOT Learning Center
Virginia Department of Transportation
Richmond, VA

Howe Crockett
TCCC Program Chairman
Office of Federal Lands Highway Division
Western Federal Lands Highway Division
Federal Highway Administration
Vancouver, WA

Laura Lawndy
Office of Asset Management (HIAM-20)
Federal Highway Administration
Washington, DC

Christopher Newman
TCCC Program Manager
System Preservation Engineer
Office of Asset Management (HIAM-20)
Federal Highway Administration
Washington, DC

Robert Peda
TCCC Maintenance Curriculum Team Leader
Director, Bureau of Maintenance and Operations
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation
Harrisburg, PA

James Sorenson
Senior Engineer & Team Leader
Office of Asset Management (HIAM-20)
Federal Highway Administration
Washington, DC

John Taylor
Training Program Manager
National Highway Institute
Arlington, VA

Douglas Townes
Construction Administration Engineer
Federal Highway Administration Resource Center
Atlanta, GA

TCCC Business Plan Table of Contents

I: Executive Summary
II: Background Information
III: Description of Products and Services
IV: Organizational Matters
V: Communications/Marketing
VI: Performance Measures
VII: Finances
VIII: Conclusions
IX: Appendix

TCCC Business Plan
I: Executive Summary

2000 - 2005: Gaining Momentum

In its first five years, the Transportation Curriculum Coordination Council (TCCC) has united experts from industry, academe, and Federal, State and local government to support transportation agencies in their technical training and certification programs. The TCCC recognizes that a qualified, skilled workforce is essential to the quality and performance of the nation's transportation infrastructure. The TCCC identifies training needs through the development of core curriculum matrices and prioritizes the development of training courses as identified in the matrices. The Council promotes commonality, course-sharing and high standards to drive down training costs, reduce duplication of course development, and offer a curriculum that springs from input from customers and that can be tailored to the specific needs of each organization.

The TCCC team of volunteers from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the National Highway Institute (NHI), AASHTO, State Highway Agencies (SHAs), Regional Technician Qualification Groups and industry share a common purpose: to sponsor and develop courses for highly skilled technicians and managers in the coming years, as State and local transportation departments continue to face the challenges of maintaining a skilled highway construction workforce.

Since its conception in 2000, the TCCC has cemented the foundations of a national resource with achievements that include:

  • Development of 16 courses in partnership with NHI (distinguished by 6-digit course numbers, Appendix 2, page 4) and four with State or regional developers for use by other SHAs and regions. The TCCC provided technical panelists and their expertise to ensure that the courses will be useful to other SHAs for their certification programs.
  • The Core Curriculum Matrix (Stage One), representing a wealth of training knowledge from across the States. The strategic document consolidates the core skill competencies in which trainees should demonstrate knowledge in the areas of construction, maintenance, materials, safety/work zones, and employee development. The Matrix of over 2000 competencies has been made available on CD to 700 State, local, and industry training managers and developers as a foundation for training programs that can be adapted by anyone. In Stage Two the TCCC will establish a methodology for cross-referencing the competencies against existing training so that the curriculum can be used in the process of identifying and prioritizing new and needed courses for development.
  • The pooled fund that provides a source of funding for training course development and support of TCCC activities. Developing a training course can cost $150,000 or more if an individual agency starts from scratch. TCCC's efforts can take a comparable amount of money and develop a course that can be used by all SHAs and local partners. The finished products can be tailored to the needs of each agency, and are thus available for use in their technical training programs at a fraction of the development cost. The training budgets of individual agencies can therefore be used more efficiently, and the money saved nationally is substantial.
  • The web site, www.nhi.fhwa.dot.gov/tccc, and initial marketing materials that are the basis for communicating TCCC goals, activities and products to an expanding customer base. The TCCC web site also maintains a clearinghouse of training courses available through NHI, SHAs, regional certification groups, transportation institutes, and universities. The clearinghouse is searchable by technical subject and indicates whether courses are state specific or nationally applicable, provides objectives and content information, and lists points of contact for those interested in obtaining a copy of the materials. The database will ultimately constitute a nationwide resource for transportation technical training.
  • A strong administrative support network that tracks projects, arranges travel and conferences, and serves as comptroller.

During its first five "building" years, the pillars and products of the TCCC evolved. The organizational structure of the TCCC was right for the times, and reflected the functions required to cement a foundation and gain traction. The engines of progress have been volunteers organized into ad hoc technical committees and panels focused on the Matrix and courses, led by a program chair and team leaders and supported by FHWA.


2005 - 2010: Sustainable Growth

The TCCC is now positioned to move to the next level of productivity and mission accomplishment. Strategic plans for the next five years include widening the customer base and targeting pooled fund contributions from all 50 States at a total of $1 million per year. The TCCC will tackle Stage Two of the Core Curriculum Matrix Development by identifying "best in field" training and mapping it to the now-defined skill competencies; determining training gaps, filling them, and prioritizing course development. The Curriculum Matrix will be a key part of the process used by TCCC for prioritizing courses for development. The Council will implement short-term and multi-year communications initiatives to expand its print, electronic and word of mouth visibility to share information among stakeholders. Finally, as part of a business performance improvement methodology, the TCCC will track customer feedback on the quality of its training materials and on its effectiveness at meeting customer needs.

To execute its plans, attain the next level of customer satisfaction, and ensure that the TCCC remains a State-led, State-focused Council, this business plan is predicated on a TCCC restructure in 2005.

A first-ever TCCC Chief Executive Officer has been appointed and will serve as the primary AASHTO liaison, champion the organization to stakeholders, oversee a new Executive Council, and advise the TCCC on priorities for the use of pooled funds and development of course materials.

An Executive Council, led by the current TCCC Program Chair, will consist of members with voting and approval authority for spending TCCC funding and the prioritizing of TCCC initiatives. Reporting to the Executive Council will be the chairs of each standing committee, who will be appointed by the Executive Council. Committee chairs will participate in the Executive Council's meetings, but will not receive voting rights unless the chair is already a member of the Executive Council. The Executive Council will meet quarterly in person or via video/teleconference, and will teleconference monthly for the first six months of the implementation of these plans.

The standing committees will be:

  • Committee for Course Development and Distribution
  • Committee for Core Curriculum Matrix Implementation
  • Committee for Resource Advancement
  • Committee for Communications/Marketing
  • Committee for Performance Measurements

The Executive Council will include representatives from FHWA, NHI, the five regional certification training groups, the National Transportation Training Directors (NTTD), and the three AASHTO subcommittees currently represented on the TCCC, with the addition of any other AASHTO subcommittee that will be represented on the TCCC in the future.

The Committee for Course Development and Distribution will design a strategy to increase stakeholder participation in course development and sharing. It will assign new course development to the appropriate technical panels, which oversee the substance of individual courses through NHI procedures and actively locate courses already available within the transportation construction/maintenance area. It will create a process and standards to review courses provided by SHAs or other organizations and correlate them to core competencies and skill levels met. This committee and the Committee for Core Curriculum Matrix Implementation will work jointly to identify needed courses, prioritize them according to resources, and oversee their development. It will establish practices and protocols for making new and existing TCCC training available to transportation departments for use in their qualification programs. The Chair of this committee is ideally a "director of training" who bases products and services on the needs of stakeholders.

The Committee for Core Curriculum Matrix Implementation will continue its structure of five team leaders and technical working groups in the categories of construction, maintenance, materials, safety/work zones and employee development. Its purpose is to accomplish Stage Two of the Matrix: circumscribe the universe of available highway construction courses, match them to Matrix competencies and skill levels, identify the gaps, and use gap analysis to pinpoint needs for new training. It will design a methodology to evaluate courses according to their correlation to Matrix competencies and skill levels, supported by the Committee for Course Development and Distribution. It will continue to refine the existing curriculum matrices, and provide input on the potential need for expansion into additional technical areas.

The Committee for Resource Advancement will design a campaign to raise $1 million a year for the pooled fund by 2010 with all 50 States participating, up from current levels of participation in one or more years by 19 States at total funding levels that have ranged from $150,000 to $$330,000 per year. The campaign will start by contacting States that made commitments for one or more past years but did not transfer funds. The committee will also cultivate a base of contributors from industry associations and institutes, with a goal of ten industry contributors per year at $20,000 each by 2010. This committee will also spearhead efforts to ensure the renewal of the current pooled fund, which expires in 2007. This committee and the Committee for Communications/Marketing will work jointly to ensure that agencies understand the benefits that can be derived from their participation.

The Committee for Communications/Marketing will boost awareness of the TCCC through promotional materials, publishable editorial content, the TCCC web site, presentations, and other print and electronic communications to expand the "footprint" of the TCCC among stakeholders and brand it as the resource of choice for highway construction personnel training and qualification. The committee will work with other committees to establish message points to broadcast the activities of TCCC and its available products.

The Committee for Performance Measurements will obtain data to measure pooled fund participation and growth; participation by States and other organizations in course development, use rates of courses, and how well products meet the needs of program managers. It will institute a system of performance improvement measures to ensure that products support State training and certification programs; that the level of design is sufficient for easy adaptation; and that content is on target. The committee will report its metrics regularly to the Executive Council and other committees and work jointly with the other committees that will design and execute strategies for growth and improvement using the performance data. Eventually the measurements may expand to show the impact of courses on the national transportation infrastructure and correlate cost savings to training.

Comptroller and administrative functions will continue to be served by the FHWA program manager and administrative team. The team will establish a process for committees to provide regular updates, will maintain a quarterly activity/progress report based on inputs from the committees, and will distribute it throughout the TCCC to keep members in the loop.

This Business Plan is a tool for the TCCC to build on progress of the last five years and provide fiscal accountability to serve customer needs from 2005 to 2010. It will streamline decision-making; guide the new TCCC Chief Executive Officer and Executive Council in encouraging State and local agencies, industry and academe to capitalize on TCCC products and services; sustain a solid funding base; assess training gaps and design courses to bridge them; fuel a high-impact, vibrant marketing/communications program, and measure results.

The repositioning of the TCCC over the next five years will also help influence those whose policy decisions anchor the program by spotlighting the economic, quality, safety and mobility benefits unleashed by TCCC participation.

The training and qualifications of the transportation construction workforce are woven through the fabric of the transportation system, present and future. Workforce competencies reinforce safe and high-quality highway construction. Workforce qualifications command notable attention as agencies across the country face the counterpoints of a projected serious shortage of trained and experienced personnel on the one hand and budget realities on the other.

To the extent that the TCCC increases the capabilities of the construction, maintenance and materials workforce, it contributes directly to mobility in the United States, and therefore to the nation's prosperity, homeland security, and sustainable transportation infrastructure.

TCCC Business Plan
II: Background Information

I History
II Composition
III Mission Statement/Objectives
IV Pooled Fund
V Industry Background


I History

The Transportation Curriculum Coordination Council (TCCC) launched in the summer of 2000 with the purpose of improving training opportunities for highway construction workers, while applying innovative measures to reduce duplication of efforts and costs to State and local transportation agencies. The Council's goals included developing a national core curriculum that can be used by any agency and building partnerships among highway agencies and industry associations to save time and costs in developing training materials.

An idea-in-the-making since the mid-1990s, the concept of the TCCC originated after changes to 23 CFR 637 in May, 1995 required all States to have qualified/certified materials testing technicians by June 30, 2000. This caused many States to develop their own programs, curricula, and course materials for training and qualifying their workforce.

A "commonality" among training programs emerged as analysis showed that many States were developing and using similar training materials but not sharing information. That sharing--reciprocity among programs--was pivotal to eliminating duplication of efforts, managing tax dollars efficiently, and bolstering the skills and qualifications of the highway workforce. Consequently, a number of SHAs began to partner with neighboring agencies to collectively meet the challenge of program and material development. The five regional certification programs were the result of this collaboration. However, a need for further coordination existed among the five groups, and also with other SHAs as well as AASHTO.

From its first meeting, the TCCC focused on developing a curriculum for State highway agencies to use as a basis for their overall training and development programs, while offering enough flexibility to accommodate different departmental structures and operations.

The TCCC was developed as a partnership among FHWA and its National Highway Institute, State and local transportation agencies, industry associations and institutes, and academe. The TCCC works to combine resources and knowledge to develop standardized technical training materials for all stakeholders. Its core curriculum reinforces the training and qualification of the highway construction workforce by promoting uniformity and awareness of training courses available to agencies to support their programs. Its training course materials are designed to be "stand alone" or adaptable to State certification program requirements and to maximize the use of AASHTO standards.

In 2001, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Subcommittees on Construction and Materials (Standing Committee on Highways) both voted in favor of a resolution supporting a national pooled-fund effort to support training development. This concept also received early support from The Associated General Contractors of America and the American Road and Transportation Builders Association.

The prospect of the proliferation of a multitude of similar programs spotlights the TCCC premise: to develop a program once with core information. Examples of core information include instructor guides, participant workbooks, manuals, Power Point presentations, videos, handouts, and study guides.

The TCCC has gathered momentum in its short history in terms of maintaining high quality products and services for customers; responding to the imperative of coordinated construction-related training for highway personnel; and establishing a proven, equitable mechanism for agencies and industry to collaborate.


II Composition

The TCCC is an organization of volunteers who represent:

  • Federal Highway Administration and National Highway Institute
  • American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Standing Committee on Highways
    • Subcommittee on Construction
    • Subcommittee on Materials
    • Subcommittee on Maintenance
  • State Highway Administrations/Departments of Transportation
  • Regional Technician Certification Groups (State highway agency training officers and materials and construction engineers):
    • NETTCP: New England Transportation Technician Certification Program
    • MARTCP: Mid-Atlantic Region Technician Certification Program
    • SETFTTQ: Southeast Task Force on Technician Training and Certification
    • M-TRAC: North Central Multi-Regional Training and Certification Program
    • WAQTC: Western Alliance for Quality Transportation Construction
  • Local Technical Assistance Program (LTAP)
  • National Transportation Training Directors (NTTD)
  • Industry Associations, Institutes and Partnerships
    • American Concrete Pavement Association (ACPA)
    • American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA)
    • American Traffic Safety Services Association (ATSSA)
    • The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC)
    • Association of Drilled Shaft Contractors (ADSC)
    • Foundation for Pavement Preservation (FP2)
    • National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA)
    • National Ready Mixed Concrete Association (NRMCA)
    • National Institute for Certification of Engineering Technologies (NICET)
    • National Partnership for Highway Quality (NPHQ)

All public and private agencies with a stake in the training and development of the highway construction workforce are invited and encouraged to join the TCCC, use its resources, and contribute to the pooled fund.


III Mission Statement/Objectives

We, the members of the Transportation Curriculum Coordination Council, commit to national leadership, coordination, and cooperation in the development of a curriculum, in construction, maintenance, materials, project management, and associated transportation disciplines, that is designed to improve the skills and abilities of the participants.

To accomplish this we embrace the following objectives:

  • maximize resources through concerted efforts in the development of training and qualification mediums
  • sharpen the skills and improve the abilities of personnel in our fields of interest
  • promote uniformity in training content and qualification requirements to facilitate reciprocity between States and regions
  • share training and qualification materials and techniques with our partners
  • maximize usage of AASHTO standards in training development
  • encourage development of and improvement to AASHTO standards through our regional groups
  • remain open, sensitive, and responsive to the expressed needs and voice of our partners
  • contribute equitably to assure success

IV Pooled Fund

Development of training courses is a very resource-intensive and expensive process. The NHI and FHWA program offices have provided a significant amount of money since 2001 to this end, and recognized that a continuous source of dedicated funding would be necessary to carry out the mission and development needs of the TCCC. Based on the recommendation for the development of a core training curriculum by AASHTO's Standing Committee on Highways (SCOH) on December 1, 2001, the FHWA's Office of Asset Management initiated pooled fund project TPF-5(046), which is approved for use of Federal-aid funds for research and development studies without State matching. Participating States are authorized to proceed with the study using 100% State Planning and Research (SP&R) funding, Federal aid training funds, or other State funds. The pooled fund project was intended to be administered for a 5-year period and used to facilitate management of the TCCC at the national level and for the development of curriculum and core training materials identified by the TCCC technical panel.

At its inception, the concept was strongly supported by several AASHTO subcommittees and contributions to the pooled fund have come from 19 States, as well as from industry associations.

The original pooled fund scope of work included:

  • Development of core curriculum materials to be identified under the direction of the TCCC to address national and regional needs
  • Promote uniformity in training content and qualifications requirements
  • Advocate the dissemination of information among training and certifying regional groups and industrial organizations
  • Encourage the development and improvement of AASHTO standards while maximizing their usage in training and development
  • Share information on the growth and development of reciprocity among industry and State work forces
  • Creation of a web page clearinghouse of curriculum information

V Industry Background

The construction industry is expected to add nearly one million new jobs between 2002 and 2012, an increase of 15%, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Yet the country faces a serious shortfall of trained, experienced people due to mobility, job changes and retirements. Federal, State, and local transportation departments stand to lose large numbers of their skilled highway construction and maintenance workforces in the coming years. Similar concerns apply to the private sector.

Rebuilding the labor workforce, including the highway workforce, is an industry priority. At the same time, cutting-edge construction and system preservation technologies demand new skills and knowledge from highway workers. Training is a key factor in customer satisfaction; accelerated construction and quality workmanship are important training by-products. By using trained and certified personnel, agencies experience more accurate and reliable test results, reduced potential for agency-contractor disputes, fewer project failures, and greater assurance of the quality of materials and workmanship. The construction industry benefits from a more highly trained workforce that potentially requires less supervision, experiences less turnover, requires less rework, and produces a transportation system that is long lasting and of high quality and workmanship.

Transportation departments are required to maintain a highly skilled and qualified workforce: opportunities for training and certification are one avenue to attract and keep competent employees and ensure high quality, safe roadways. The consistency of qualification programs nationwide supports the mobility of the workforce and facilitates the replacement of workers who have left or retired.

TCCC Business Plan
III: Description of Products and Services

I Core Curriculum Training Matrix
II Course Development and Course Sharing
III National Clearinghouse/Web Site
IV National Experts/Advisors


I Core Curriculum Training Matrix

Stage One of the TCCC's Core Curriculum Training Matrix for transportation disciplines is on CD and has been posted at the TCCC web site. The Matrix is a tool to help State and local agencies establish a basis for technical training and ongoing professional development programs. It is intended to assist training developers in establishing comprehensive curriculum tracks and identifying existing training that can be used in their programs or adapted to fit. The matrices are not intended to replace, but rather to enhance, current competency models and training and professional development programs.

The TCCC focused on five technical categories for the Matrix: construction, employee development, maintenance, materials and safety/work zones. The purpose of the matrices will be twofold: one defines subject areas and the respective disciplines and skill competencies required to execute the work; the other will spotlight training that correlates to those defined skill competencies.

Each competency is expressed as a measurable action to be performed at each of four skill levels defining a career progression and for which a trainee should demonstrate knowledge. The levels are:

Level I Entry (new employee, little experience, under direct supervision)

Level II Intermediate (competent in area(s) of entry level, under general supervision)

Level III Advanced (specialized skills in tasks of intermediate level, little daily supervision)

Level IV Project Management-Administrator/Superintendent (mastery of skills for preceding levels, accountable for resource management, manages tasks covering a range of complexity and technical functions)

Stratifications, which define the amount of knowledge a person is required to demonstrate at each level, offer a common target for training organizations, while advancing the adherence to AASHTO standards in training development. Over the course of a two-year period, more than 40 volunteers have worked on the Matrix under the direction of team leaders, developing the curriculum matrices as a dynamic document that will be updated each year for ever-improving utility to planners of employee training and development. The FHWA has distributed the Matrix Stage One to its Division Offices and to SHAs, to ensure it reaches primary users. In addition, regional and AASHTO TCCC representatives are distributing the Matrix among their constituencies.

Stage Two entails the formalizing of procedures to use the curriculum in identifying needs for new training, review and assess courses, and connecting them to core competencies. The TCCC can then use the matrices to identify gaps in the competencies-to-training, and prioritize needs for course development within the TCCC budget. The departure point is a search of available training courses offered by public sector organizations and agencies, associations, certification organizations, academic institutions, and private, for-profit companies.


II Course Development and Course Sharing

The TCCC has been involved in the development of 16 courses in partnership with the NHI course development process; these are listed in 2001-2005 "Transportation Curriculum Coordination Council Training Development Break-Down" (Appendix). Technical panelists from SHAs and industry provided valuable perspective to ensure that the finished product would be adaptable to fit agency-specific needs. Similarly, the TCCC has produced, using original State-specific material, several training courses that can be presented in generic form or adapted for another state as necessary (e.g., surveying course).

Course materials are available to any organization.

To improve its delivery systems for TCCC courses and course-sharing, the TCCC will post or link all three categories of courses (NHI/6-digit, "genericized" and the national compilation) on the web site so that a customer looking for a course on hot mix, for instance, can find the "best in field" that suits his or her needs available for download. The customer will complete a simple online form with basic information about his/her organization and planned use so the TCCC can track and measure the number of users/trainees and gain their feedback about the quality of each course (See Section VI, Performance Measures). A second online form will solicit from the customer inputs from his/her training program to the national clearinghouse.


III Web Site/ Database

The web site, www.nhi.fhwa.dot.gov/tccc is an information pipeline for use by all potential customers, whether they contribute to the pooled fund or not. It is a primary marketing tool of the TCCC and a reservoir of information about the program, mission, objectives, the pooled fund, contacts, events, meeting information and minutes, work plans, work items/ initiatives, and member organizations.

The TCCC website includes a web-based compilation of construction and maintenance training courses. The searchable catalog of training opportunities is populated by organizations that voluntarily input information on their available courses or materials. Training officers can thus locate materials or completed courses on a wide variety of subjects - a future functionality will be to make the materials for some or all of the courses downloadable by users.

The site is the focal point for nationwide training efforts, with links to the regional training groups and State training program administrators, cross-referenced by topical area (asphalt, aggregates, Portland-cement concrete, soils, etc.). Through the linked regional sites, a network of information on State certification programs and requirements and on private sector information is made available.

The Marketing section of this business plan outlines changes to the web site that will allow the TCCC to capture information in ways that may be more useful to customers, while highlighting TCCC course sharing objectives and promoting the pooled fund.


IV National Experts/Advisors

The success of the TCCC can be attributed to the service and expertise of its volunteers. Volunteer contact information for participating panelists can be found in the Appendix to this plan, as well as on the TCCC web site. The experience and knowledge of the TCCC volunteers in construction, materials, and maintenance are the reservoirs of expertise that sustain and perpetuate the organization. The team is a national resource aggressively addressing the challenges facing today's transportation agencies in maintaining a highly trained construction workforce for the 21st century.

TCCC Business Plan
IV: Organizational Matters

In its first five years, the TCCC was organized into technical committees, panels and working groups that developed the foundational tools and products to advance its mission. In 2005, the TCCC will reorganize according to the organizational chart below in order to pursue further Matrix implementation and course development while expanding the "marketing" of knowledge about the TCCC to increase its base of customers and raise awareness of its value in the transportation workforce arena. The restructuring will also assist in measuring the use and quality of products; encouraging more agencies and organizations to partner with the TCCC; ensuring the renewal of the pooled fund; and increasing the pooled fund to $1 million a year with all 50 States and at least 10 industry organizations participating by 2010.

The new organizational structure is designed to allow expeditious review, consensus and approval of decisions and action steps to further the mission. The following diagram outlines the TCCC structure:

TCCC Organizational Chart

A first-ever TCCC Chief Executive Officer representing the States and AASHTO will champion the organization to stakeholders; oversee a new Executive Council, and advise the TCCC on priorities for the use of pooled funds and development of course materials.

An Executive Council, led by the already-existing TCCC Program Chair, will consist of ten members with voting and approval authority on such issues as strategic direction, initiatives, and the spending of TCCC funds. The Executive Council will include representatives from FHWA, NHI, the five regional certification training groups, the National Transportation Training Directors organization (NTTD), and the three AASHTO subcommittees currently represented on the TCCC, with the addition of any other AASHTO subcommittee that may be represented on the TCCC in the future.

Standing committees will include the following; each with a Chairperson.

  • Committee for Course Development and Distribution
  • Committee for Core Curriculum Matrix Implementation
  • Committee for Resource Advancement
  • Committee for Communications/Marketing
  • Committee for Performance Measurements

The Committee for Course Development and Distribution will design a strategy to increase stakeholder participation in course development and sharing. It will assign new course development to the appropriate technical panels, which oversee the substance of individual courses through NHI procedures and actively locate courses already available within the transportation construction/maintenance area. It will create a process and standards to review courses provided by SHAs or other organizations and correlate them to core competencies and skill levels met. This committee and the Committee for Core Curriculum Matrix Implementation will work jointly to identify needed courses, prioritize them according to resources, and oversee their development. The Chair of this committee is ideally a "director of training" who bases products and services on the needs of stakeholders.

The Committee for Core Curriculum Matrix Implementation will continue its structure of five team leaders and technical working groups in the categories of construction, maintenance, materials, safety/work zones and employee development. Its purpose is to accomplish Stage Two of the Matrix: circumscribe the universe of available highway construction courses, match them to Matrix competencies and skill levels, identify the gaps, and use gap analysis to pinpoint needs for new training. It will design a methodology to evaluate courses according to their correlation to Matrix competencies and skill levels, supported by the Committee for Course Development and Distribution.

The Committee for Resource Advancement will design a campaign to raise $1 million a year for the pooled fund by 2010 with all 50 States participating, up from current levels of participation in one or more years by 19 States at total funding levels that have ranged from $150,000 to $$330,000 per year. The campaign will start by contacting States that made commitments for one or more past years but did not transfer funds. It will also cultivate a base of contributors from industry associations and institutes, with a goal of ten industry contributors per year at $20,000 each by 2010. Such funds may be accepted into the pooled fund and a donor organization representative may serve on a committee, but industry representatives will not serve as a member of the Executive Council and will not have a voting right. This committee will also spearhead efforts to ensure the renewal of the current pooled fund, which expires in 2007. This committee and the Committee for Communications/Marketing will work jointly to ensure that agencies understand the benefits that can be derived from their participation.

The Committee for Communications/Marketing will boost awareness of the TCCC through promotional materials, publishable editorial content, the TCCC web site, presentations, and other print and electronic communications to expand the "footprint" of the TCCC among stakeholders and brand it as the resource of choice for highway construction personnel training and qualification.

The Committee for Performance Measurements will obtain data to measure pooled fund participation and growth; participation by States and other organizations in course development, use rates of courses, and how well products meet the needs of program managers. It will institute a system of performance improvement measures to ensure that products support State training and certification programs; that the level of design is sufficient for easy adaptation; and that content is on target. The committee will report its metrics regularly to the Executive Council and other committees and work jointly with the other committees that will design and execute strategies for growth and improvement using the performance data. Eventually the measurements may expand to show the impact of courses on the national transportation infrastructure and correlate cost savings to training.

All Committees will submit a work plan and budget for approval of the Executive Council on an annual basis, and will advise of any major updates or revisions to the plan and budget. It is anticipated that some specific work activities will involve combined efforts of two or more committees or their members. For example, development of new courses needs the input of the Course Development and Curriculum committees, along with coordination with the Marketing committee (to increase customer awareness) and Performance Measurement (to help indicate whether the course successfully meets customer needs). Work plans should reflect expected cross-over involvement of other Committees, as appropriate. Committee chairs should regularly coordinate with one another to keep abreast of activities to which their group could also contribute.

Comptroller and administrative functions will continue to be served by a FHWA program manager and administrative team. The team will establish a process for committees to provide regular updates (as appropriate), will maintain a quarterly activity/progress report based on inputs from the committees, and will distribute it throughout the TCCC to keep members in the loop.

As a parallel document, the TCCC has devised draft Bylaws to formalize the details through which the committees operate.

TCCC Business Plan
V: Communications/Marketing

I The Market and Marketing
II The Message Distilled
III Distribution/Communications Channels
IV Outreach: Growing the Customer Base
V Web Site Revamp
VI Multi-year Communications Plan


I The Market and Marketing

The current potential customer base for TCCC products and services includes State and local transportation agencies, industry associations and transportation institutes. These are also the prospective contributors to the TCCC pooled fund and other resource mechanisms. In the next five years the TCCC will grow this stakeholder "market" and attract other influencers through strategic public relations and marketing campaigns.

The TCCC's current strengths in terms of promotional materials are the web site, the brochure, flyers for some courses, PowerPoint briefings used at workshops and meetings, table top displays for conferences like TRB, a TCCC folder, and a compendium of success stories-in-progress.

The current run of 5000 print brochures has received wide distribution through the TCCC program chair, program manager, NHI, NPHQ, and TCCC members and team leaders at conferences.

The success stories deserve special mention as foundations for an energetic communications program poised for sustainable growth.

To date, the communications channels for championing the TCCC and publicizing the advantages and availability of products and services have been primarily word of mouth and information relays from the core TCCC representatives through regional, State and organizational channels. Current volunteers keep management informed and convey member interests through the web site and at workshops, meetings and conferences.

From 2005 forward, the TCCC will expand its promotional product line and communications channels in order to widen its footprint, elevate the visibility of the pooled fund, garner more widespread involvement by stakeholders in courses and the Matrix, advertise new (and existing) products and services, and produce editorial content to support the five committees of the TCCC.

To accomplish these priorities, the TCCC Communications/Marketing Committee will focus on the following:

  1. Consistent, compelling messages/themes in promotional products to headline the TCCC's value
  2. Distribution vehicles to get the promotional materials and messages to the right people in the right organizations to augment the efforts of TCCC representatives
  3. Outreach: expanding the customer base and pooled fund participation
  4. A web site revamp, with home page featuring "what's new", a photo and message from the new CEO and a menu bar that spotlights "About the TCCC," pooled fund, ongoing activities, core curriculum Matrix, course clearinghouse, and training contacts
  5. A multi-year communications/marketing plan that can be implemented within available funding

Progress in these five areas will support the TCCC's objectives and the efforts of all the new TCCC Committees: Resource Advancement, Course Development and Distribution, Performance Measurements, Core Curriculum Matrix Implementation and Communications/ Marketing.


II The Focus of the Message

The key questions that must be addressed in any effort to influence action by stakeholders are threefold:

  • What are we trying to accomplish?
  • Who do we need to "move" to accomplish this?
  • What do they need to hear in order to be motivated to "move"?

A set of TCCC annual key messages will be developed by the Committee for Communications/Marketing using this framework. Presentation materials will be developed and kept current for use by TCCC members at conferences and other gatherings.


III Distribution/Communications Channels

To date, the conduits for publicizing the value of the TCCC and the availability of TCCC products and services have primarily been the council members of the TCCC through their organizational channels; the TCCC web site; teleconferences; workshops, meetings and conferences.

The Communication/ Marketing Committee will propose a short-term and a multi-year plan. The multi-year plan will provide for products and activities that will make the TCCC the nation's foremost resource for transportation technical training knowledge. Once approved by the Executive Council, this plan will carry out the long range vision of the TCCC.


IV Outreach: Growing the Customer Base

The TCCC Communications/Marketing Plan can also include several short-term action steps to expand the customer base; longer-term initiatives are addressed below in the Multi-year Communications Plan section.

Such steps might include:

  • Research and identify untapped networks and providers who have up-and-running communications networks TCCC can leverage and that are likely candidates as TCCC strategic partners, users of TCCC products, or course sponsors.
  • Increase bookings for TCCC briefings/exhibits at AASHTO, FHWA, TRB, regional training, county/local government events, LTAP workshops and industry conferences and meetings; set a performance measure goal annually for exhibit space/briefing opportunities. Where possible, have attending TCCC members staff the exhibit during key hours.
  • Poll TCCC representatives on the numbers of workshops/conferences in which they participate, and the numbers of promotional materials distributed at these events. Use both as metrics to help assess the TCCC footprint.

V Web Site Revamp

The TCCC web site hosts a wealth of information about the Council's purpose, history, progress, meetings and events. With some simple architectural and content adjustments, the information can become more user-friendly and more valuable as a resource.

In 2005, the Communications/Marketing Committee can begin making short-terms changes in the TCCC web site to improve ease of use and provide for improved content organization. In the long term, and as part of a multi-year communications strategy, more significant "renovations" can improve data collection, user interaction, branding, and depth of content.


VI Multi-year Communications Plan

A communications plan is a necessary step towards continued TCCC progress and success by keeping present stakeholders informed while energizing prospective customers with success stories, news and progress.

As part of a Multi-year Communications/Marketing plan, the Committee can adopt measures to:

  • Underscore TCCC contributions to the national transportation system and its users.
  • Institutionalize marketing resources.
  • Keep the communications conduit flowing with fresh success stories and news events.
  • Increase the universe of State, local and industry highway personnel who know about the TCCC's pooled fund, products and services.
  • Increase the universe of stakeholders who share course materials and support the TCCC financially.
  • Design and implement a news release recognition program for States and other organizations that participate in the pooled fund, to recognize active members for their service in kind. Post the news releases on the TCCC web site and send to the communications office of the honored State transportation agency for distribution through its internal and external channels.

The Communications/Marketing Committee will work with other Committees to ensure that ongoing and completed work activities are communicated to the customers, and to ensure that marketing efforts and message points are up-to-date. It will develop a sample framework and ongoing guidance regarding the development of both short-term and multi-year goals and materials.

TCCC Business Plan
VI: Performance Measures

From 2005 to 2010, the TCCC will advance to the next level of achievement described throughout this business plan. To do so, and to continuously improve customer satisfaction, the TCCC needs a system to ensure that products are meeting customer expectations and needs.

When an organization can measure its key processes and products, it gains insight into and leverage over operations. The TCCC intends to collect and analyze data about the Pooled Fund and other financial resources as well as about product usage in order to define the TCCC customer base and design strategies for growth.

TCCC will also institute a system of performance improvement measures to ensure that products are supporting State training and certification programs; that the level of design is sufficient for easy adaptation; and that content is on target.

The performance measurement and improvement processes TCCC chooses should serve three guiding principles:

  • A determination to constantly improve
  • A spotlight on serving customers
  • A methodology that is easy to use and allows ongoing comparisons to track progress

To that end, the Committee for Performance Measurements will design surveys or questionnaires to obtain and analyze data that can lead to these continuous quality improvements and to increased relevance/utility of TCCC products and services.

Between 2005 and 2010, the Committee will spearhead data collection, with the collaboration of other Committees on strategies for growth and development, that will allow TCCC to:

  • Design measures of effectiveness, survey training program managers
  • Set short-term goals for metrics and feedback on quality
  • Establish that it is essential to renew the Pooled Fund in 2007 and establish additional streams and sources of income
  • Target for 2010 a goal of 100% State participation in
    • Input into TCCC Courses
    • Use of courses
    • Sharing of available courses
    • Feedback about each TCCC training product developed or "genericized"
    • Financial support of Pooled Fund
    • Sharing of human resources to support TCCC goals

To aid in the conduct of its duties, the Committee for Performance Measurements will be provided with a sample framework for measurement and gap analysis, and will avail itself of the performance measurement resources of the National Highway Institute.

TCCC Business Plan
VII: Finances

The TCCC is funded by the FHWA, NHI and pooled fund project TPF-5(406), which was signed in 2002 and authorized initial funding through 2007. The fund was based on recommendations for a core training curriculum by AASHTO.

From 2001 through 2005, the FHWA Office of Asset Management funded the TCCC at $1,317,355, all of which was expended in support of TCCC training course development and activities.

From 2001 through 2005, The National Highway Institute funded the TCCC at $1,506,138, all of which was expended in support of TCCC training course development and activities.

To date, 19 States have contributed in one or more years to the pooled fund at levels ranging from $10,000 to $30,000 in a given year. In the four years since the pooled fund became operational in 2002, contributions from the States have totaled about $1 million in support of TCCC training course development and activities.

In-kind contributions of technical staff have been provided by members of the AASHTO subcommittees on construction, maintenance and materials, State departments of transportation, Regional Technician Certification Groups, and other stakeholders.

From 2001 through 2005, total FHWA funding for the TCCC-from both the Office of Asset Management ($1,317,355) and the National Highway Institute ($1,506,138)--totaled $2,823,493. Through the pooled fund, States and industry contributed a combined $1,050,000.

The pooled fund so far has been populated by 19 State partners. These 19 have availed themselves of TCCC resources to varying degrees: some consistently, some not at all. The remaining States have either committed funds but not transferred them, or have neither committed to nor paid into the pooled fund since its inception.

Because the TCCC has focused in its first five years on establishing its network of shareholders, launching the pooled fund, developing the Matrix and priority courses, and creating the web site, its donor development efforts are in a fledgling stage are but poised for a surge forward. Not all States are aware of the benefits they can accrue from amplifying a voice and exercising a choice in critical training resources for their people, maximizing use of the Matrix, sharing courses, reaching AASHTO and other national standards, and not having to "go it alone" in terms of course development at a time when budgets are an issue.

For these reasons, the TCCC financial roadmap for 2005-2010 includes the objectives of generating, by 2010, annual pooled fund participation from all 50 States at a level of at least $20,000 per State each year; to contact and follow through (2005 onward) with States that commit monies to the pooled fund but whose funds are not transferred; and to solicit and cultivate a new base of at least 10 consistent contributors from industry associations and institutes that will also fund at $20,000 per year.

The Resource Advancement Committee has primary responsibility for defining action steps to reach the goals of 100% State participation for a $1 million/year goal of State contributions; soliciting new pooled fund participants from transportation industry associations and institutes; and helping to ensure the pooled fund is renewed past 2007.

The Resource Advancement Committee will be supported by promotional materials, publications, and distribution networks produced by the Communications/Marketing Committee. Higher visibility for the TCCC and an eventual branding of the Council will expand its "footprint" across the States and command attention to its benefits and accomplishments in behalf of stakeholders and ultimate customers: the driving public.

TCCC Business Plan
VIII: Conclusions
  1. Reorganize the TCCC to streamline decision making, grow participation in the pooled fund, vault the Matrix to the next level, press ahead with course development and sharing, elevate visibility for TCCC products and services, and launch a new methodology to measure participation in the pooled fund, stakeholder involvement in the development and use of TCCC products, and how well products meet the needs of stakeholders. The proposed reorganization for Executive Council approval is:

    TCCC Organizational Chart

  2. Use this Business Plan as a recruitment tool for TCCC leaders and partners.
  3. Approve the revised bylaws in Section IV
  4. Advance the case for pooled fund renewal and grow the fund: renewal in 2007; 50 States and 10 industry associations/institutes participating by 2010.

    How?
    • Gap analysis study to determine why States are not participating in pooled fund
    • Champion the program among AASHTO members
    • Market program to States and industry
    • Recognize State participation with certificates, publicity, awards
    • In exhibits, briefings, brochures, direct mailings and media opportunities, spotlight value of contributing for States/organizations
    Who?
    1. Committee for Resource Advancement
      • Determine the key points of contact ("centers of gravity") within each State DOT and industry association to be influenced to prompt State contributions to the pooled fund and interactions for course development
      • Reach these "centers of gravity" by e-mail, letter, call or visits to explain the value of participating
      • Start with States that have pledged contributions in the past but have not transmitted funds (Appendix). These have pre-existing interest/knowledge of the pooled fund
      • Identify untapped industry organizations/institutes that might contribute to the pooled fund. Example: National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) (Appendix)
    2. Committee on Course Development and Distribution
      • Equip the Committee for Resource Advancement with both a gap analysis for why states are not currently participating in/using TCCC course development and a strategy to increase participation in course development
      • Equip the Committee for Resource Advancement with a comprehensive list of available courses
    3. Committee for Communications/Marketing
      • Equip pooled fund growers with promotional materials needed to market the TCCC and convince stakeholders to join. Assemble an information kit that includes the Matrix CD, available courses, TCCC brochure, Success Story fact sheet, and TCCC PowerPoint. In future briefings, editorial content, media opportunities and direct mailings, spotlight value of participation
      • Revamp web site to spotlight value of participating
      • Design a recognition program (news releases, certificates, awards) for participating States/organizations
    4. Committee for Performance Measurements
      • Using the "Measures of Effectiveness and Performance Improvement Processes" methodology in Section VI, obtain data for, measure and monitor "States Contributing to Pooled Fund Program" to fuel strategy and efforts to increase numbers
    5. TCCC CEO
      • Champion the pooled fund among AASHTO members
  5. Implement short and multi-year communications plans to spotlight TCCC contributions to the national transportation system and efforts to grow the numbers of qualified workers in the U.S.; institutionalize marketing resources; and pump a steady stream of high quality information to key stakeholders. The success of other committees' efforts hinges on effective communications. From 2005 forward, the TCCC will expand its promotional product line and communications channels in order to widen its footprint, elevate the visibility of the pooled fund, garner more widespread involvement by stakeholders in courses and the Matrix, advertise new (and existing) products and services, and produce editorial content to support the other committees.

    Who?
    • Committee for Communications/Marketing
    How?
    • Short Term Tactics
      1. Consistent, compelling messages/themes in promotional products to headline the TCCC's value
      2. Distribution vehicles to get the promotional materials and messages to the right people in the right organizations in order to augment the efforts of TCCC representatives
      3. Outreach products to expand the customer base
      4. A short term web site revamp to improve ease of use and delineate content organization
    • Long Term Strategy
      1. TCCC Multi-year Communications/Marketing Plan will keep the TCCC ball moving down the field by energizing stakeholders with news and progress influencing decision makers who affect program outcomes
  6. Advance Stage Two of Matrix (Committee for Core Curriculum Matrix Implementation) with an emphasis on the design of a methodology to evaluate courses according to their correlation to Matrix competencies and skill level; identify gaps; perform gap analysis.
  7. Advance course development and sharing (Committee for Course Development and Distribution) with the design of a strategy to increase stakeholder participation in course development and sharing; an emphasis on actively locating courses already available within the transportation construction/maintenance area; and the creation of a process and standards to review courses provided by SHAs or other organizations and correlate them to core competencies and skill levels met.
  8. Measure TCCC effectiveness, survey customers, set goals for metrics and quality feedback, and target 100% participation by States for course inputs, use of courses, sharing of courses, and feedback about courses. Share data with other committees for their analysis and strategizing for growth/improvement. Primary measurements may include:
    • States Contributing to Pooled Fund
    • States Participating in Course Development
    • States Requesting/Using TCCC Products
    • Total Number of Workers Trained by TCCC Courses
    • Analysis of Workers Trained by TCCC Courses (in terms of increase in knowledge or skill level)
    • Overall Quality of Courses Provided by TCCC
    • Training Needs Met
    • Effectiveness of Course Development Process
      • Efficiency of Process
      • Timeliness/Schedule Conformance
      • Mechanism for Immediate Response
TCCC Business Plan
IX: Appendix

TCCC Contacts
LTAP/TTAP Center Contacts
National Center for Construction Education and Research Background


TCCC Contacts

Pete Rahn
TCCC Chief Executive Officer
Director, Missouri Department of Transportation
105 West Capitol Avenue
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Phone: (573) 751-4622
E-mail: Pete.Rahn@modot.mo.gov

Howe Crockett
Chairperson, Executive Council
Western Federal Lands Highway Division (WFLHD)
610 East Fifth Street
Vancouver, WA 98661
Phone: (360) 619-7750
Fax: (360) 619-7846
E-mail: Howe.Crockett@fhwa.dot.gov

Doyt Bolling
Chairperson, Committee for Course Development and Distribution
Director, Utah LTAP Center
Utah State University
4111 Old Main Hill
Logan, UT 84322-4111
Phone: (435) 797-2933
Fax: (435) 797-1582
E-mail: doyt@cc.usu.edu

Linda Hughes
Chairperson, Committee for Core Curriculum Matrix Implementation
Construction Training Coordinator
Washington DOT
MS 47365
1655 South 2nd Avenue
Tumwater, WA 98504-7365
Phone: (360) 709-5412
Fax: (360) 709-5588
E-mail: HugheL@wsdot.wa.gov

Lee Onstott
Chairperson, Committee for Resource Advancement
Construction Engineer
New Mexico State Highway & Transportation Department
P.O. Box 1149
Santa Fe, NM 87504
Phone: (505) 827-5631
Fax: (505) 827-5640
E-mail: Lee.Onstott@nmshtd.state.nm.us

Douglas Townes
Chairperson, Committee for Communications/Marketing
61 Forsyth Rd. SW
Suite 17T26
Atlanta, GA 30303
Phone: (404) 895-6158
Fax: (404) 562-3700
Email: douglas.townes@fhwa.dot.gov

Allan Samuels
Chairperson, Committee for Performance Measurements
Allan Samuels
Manager Construction Operations
Arizona Department of Transportation
206 South 17th Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85007
Phone: (602) 712-8940
Fax: (602) 254-5128
E-mail: asamuels@dot.state.az.us

Christopher Newman
TCCC Program Manager
Systems Preservation Engineer
Office of Asset Management (HIAM-20)
400 7th Street S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20590
Phone: (202) 366-2073
Fax: (202) 366-9981
Email: christopher.newman@fhwa.dot.gov

Laura Lawndy
Construction and Systems Preservation Team Program Assistant
Office of Asset Management (HIAM-20)
400 7th Street S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20590
Phone: (202) 366-3975
Fax: (202) 366-9981
Email: laura.lawndy@fhwa.dot.gov


Transportation Curriculum Coordination Council - Official Roster as of March, 2005
Mid-Atlantic Region Technician Certification Program (MARTCP)

Woody Hood - Materials Curriculum Team Leader
Regional Materials Engineer
Maryland State Highway Administration
2323 West Joppa Road
Brooklandville, MD 21022
Phone: (410) 321-4100
Fax: (410) 321-3099
E-mail: whood@sha.state.md.us

New England Transportation Technician Certification Program (NETTCP)

Leo Stevens
NETTCP
84 Moatview Road
North Conway, NH 03860
Phone: (603) 356-3939
Fax:(781) 837-2683
E-mail: lstevensjr@adelphia.net

Southeast Task Force on Technician Training and Certification (SETFTTC)

Ken Cox
Florida Department of Transportation

North Central Multi-Regional Training and Certification Program (M-Trac)

Christine Anderson - Prof. Development Curriculum Team Leader
Technical Training & Certification Coordinator
Iowa Department of Transportation
800 Lincoln Way
Ames, IA 50010
Phone: (515) 239-1819
Fax: (515) 239-1092
E-mail: Christie.Anderson@dot.state.ia.us

Catherine Betts
Technical Certification Specialist
Office of Construction and Contract Administration
Minnesota Department of Transportation
Technical Certification MS650
395 John Ireland Blvd.
St. Paul MN 55155-1819
Phone: (651) 297- 7195
Fax: (651) 296-3811
E-mail: Catherine.Betts@dot.state.mn.us

Laird Weishahn (alternate)
Nebraska Department of Roads
1400 NE Highway 2
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: (402) 479-4675
Fax: (402) 479-3975
E-mail: lweishah@dor.state.ne.us

Western Alliance for Quality Transportation Construction (WAQTC)

Garth Newman
Training Specialist
Idaho Transportation Department
P.O. Box 7129
Boise, ID 83707-1129
Phone: (208) 334-8039
Fax: (208) 334-4411
E-mail: garth.newman@itd.idaho.gov

Western Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (WASHTO)

Linda Hughes
Construction Training Coordinator
Washington DOT
MS 47365
1655 South 2nd Avenue
Tumwater, WA 98504-7365
Phone: (360) 709-5412
Fax: (360) 709-5588
E-mail: HugheL@wsdot.wa.gov

National Transportation Training Directors (NTTD)

Martha Monjo
Training and Development Director
Disadvantaged Business Enterprise and Special Projects Division
South Carolina Department of Transportation
PO Box 191
Columbia, SC 29201
Phone: 803-737-1371
Fax: 803-737-1966
Email: monjoms@dot.state.sc.us

AASHTO Subcommittee on Construction

Allan Samuels - Construction Team Leader
Manager Construction Operations
Arizona Department of Transportation
206 South 17th Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85007
Phone: (602) 712-8940
Fax: (602) 254-5128
E-mail: asamuels@dot.state.az.us

Lee Onstott
Construction Engineer
New Mexico State Highway & Transportation Department
P.O. Box 1149
Santa Fe, NM 87504
Phone: (505) 827-5631
Fax: (505) 827-5640
E-mail: Lee.Onstott@nmshtd.state.nm.us

Bill Beuter
Construction Training Manager
VDOT Learning Center
Virginia Department of Transportation
1401 East Broad Street
Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: (804) 371-4875
Fax: (804) 786-4290
E-mail: Bill.Beuter@VirginiaDOT.org

AASHTO Subcommittee on Maintenance

James Feda - Maintenance Curriculum Team Leader
Director, Bureau of Maintenance and Operations
South Carolina Department of Transportation
400 North Street, 6th Floor
P.O. Box 2857
Harrisburg, PA 17105-2857
Phone: (717) 787-6899
Fax: (717) 705-5520
Email: rpeda@state.pa.us

AASHTO Subcommittee on Materials

Tom Malerk
State Materials Engineer
Florida Department of Transportation
2006 NE Waldo Road
Gainesville, FL 32609
Phone: (352) 337-3170
Fax: (352) 337-3168
E-mail: tom.malerk@dot.state.fl.us

AASHTO Subcommittee on Traffic & Safety

Pending

Federal Highway Administration
Headquarters

Christopher Newman - Program Manager
Systems Preservation Engineer
Office of Asset Management (HIAM - 20)
400 7th Street S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20590
Phone: (202) 366-2073
Fax: (202) 366-9981
Email: christopher.newman@fhwa.dot.gov

Laura Lawndy
Construction and Systems Preservation Team Program Assistant
Office of Asset Management (HIAM - 20)
400 7th Street S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20590
Phone: (202) 366-3975
Fax: (202) 366-9981
Email: laura.lawndy@fhwa.dot.gov

Matthew Corrigan
Asphalt Pavement Engineer
Federal Highway Administration
400 7th Street, SW
HIPT-20
Washington, DC 20590
Phone: (202) 366-1549
Fax: (202) 493-2070
E-mail: matthew.corrigan@fhwa.dot.gov

Office of Federal Lands Highway Division

Howe Crockett - Program Chairman
Western Federal Lands Highway Division (WFLHD)
610 East Fifth Street
Vancouver, WA 98661
Phone: (360) 619-7750
Fax: (360) 619-7846
E-mail: Howe.Crockett@fhwa.dot.gov

National Highway Institute

Lesley Bolden
NHI Training Program Manager
Federal Highway Administration
Office of Professional Development
4600 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 800
Arlington, VA 22203
Tel. (703) 235-0553
Fax: (703) 235-0593
E-mail: lesley.bolden@fhwa.dot.gov

Debbie Gwaltney
Federal Highway Administration
Office of Professional Development
4600 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 800
Arlington, VA 22203
Tel. (703) 235-1199
Fax (703) 235-0593
E-mail: debbie.gwaltney@fhwa.dot.gov

National Resource Center (Atlanta)

Rob Elliott
Construction and Project Management Technical Service Team Leader
61 Forsyth Rd. SW
Suite 17T26
Atlanta, GA 30303
Phone: (404) 562-3941
Fax: (404) 562-3700
Email: rob.elliott@fhwa.dot.gov

Douglas Townes
61 Forsyth Rd. SW
Suite 17T26
Atlanta, GA 30303
Phone: (404) 895-6158
Fax: (404) 562-3700
Email: douglas.townes@fhwa.dot.gov

LTAP Liaison

Doyt Bolling
Director, Utah LTAP Center
Utah State University
4111 Old Main Hill
Logan, UT 84322-4111
Phone: (435) 797-2933
Fax: (435) 797-1582
E-mail: doyt@cc.usu.edu

Industry Representatives
ACPA

Michael E. Ayers, Ph.D.
Director of Pavement Technology Services
American Concrete Pavement Association
5420 Old Orchard Road
Suite A100
Skokie, Illinois 60077-1059
Phone: (847) 966-2272
Fax: (847) 966-9970
Cell: 217-621-3438
E-mail: mayers@pavement.com

AGC

Joe Folk
TTCP Program Administrator
Associated Contractors of New Mexico
P.O. Box 25384
Albuquerque, NM 87125
Phone: (505) 344-2072
Fax: (505) 344-1554
E-mail: jfolk@aconm.org

ARTBA

Jim Childers
Training Specialist
American Road and Transportation Builders Association
1010 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
Fourth Floor
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: (202) 289-4434 (ext 181)
Fax: (202) 289-4435
E-mail: jchilders@artba.org

American Traffic Safety Services Association (ATSSA)

Donna Clark
Suite 100
15 Riverside Parkway
Fredericksburg, VA 22406
Phone: (540) 368-1701
Fax : (540) 368-1717
Email: donnac@atssa.com

National Center for Pavement Preservation

John O'Doherty
MSU Engineering Research Facility
2857 Jolly Road
Okemos, Michigan 48864
Phone: (517) 432-8220
Fax: (517) 432-8223
E-mail: ncpp@egr.msu.edu

Foundation for Pavement Preservation

Dr. Samuel H. Carpenter
205 N Mathews MC-250
Urbana, Illinois 61801
Phone: (217) 333-4188
Fax: (217) 333-1924
Email: scarpent@uiuc.edu

NAPA

Vacant

National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies (NICET)

Bud Darby
1420 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: (703) 548-1518
Email: bdarby@nicet.org

National Partnership for Highway Quality (NPHQ)

Bobby Templeton
11907 W. Highway 290
Austin, TX 78737
Phone: (512) 301-9899
Fax: (512) 301-9897
Email: btempleton@nphq.org

Other State Resources

Serji Amirkhanian
110 Lowry Hall
Civil Engineering Department
Clemson University
Clemson, SC 29634-0911
Phone: (864) 656-3316
Fax : (864) 656-2670
E-mail: serji.amirkhanian@ces.clemson.edu

Michael San Angelo
Materials Engineer
Alaska DOT&PF
Central Materials Laboratory
5750 E. Tudor Road
Anchorage, AK 99507
Phone: (907) 269-6234
E-mail: Michael_SanAngelo@dot.state.ak.us

Other FHWA Field Resources

Greg Doyle
MA Division
Phone: 617-494-3279
Fax: 619-494-2745
Email: gregory.j.doyle@fhwa.dot.gov

Mike Arasteh
NRC- Baltimore
Phone: 410-962-0678
Fax: 410-962-4586
Email: Michael.Arasteh@fhwa.dot.gov

Mike Moravec
NRC- Baltimore
Phone: 410-962-5623
Fax: 410-962-4586
Email: Mike.Moravec@fhwa.dot.gov

Lee Gallivan
Indiana Division
Phone: 317-226-7493
Fax: 317-226-7341
Email: victor.gallivan@fhwa.dot.gov

Bernie Kuta
NRC - Denver
Phone: 303-716-2196
Fax: 303-969-6740
Email: Bernie.Kuta@fhwa.dot.gov

Matt Corrigan
HIAM-HIPT
Phone: 202-366-1549
Fax: 202-493-2070
Email: Matthew.Corrigan@fhwa.dot.gov

Ben Gribbon
HAS-30
Phone: 202-366-1809
Fax: 202-366-3222
Email: Benjamin.gribbon@fhwa.dot.gov

Bill Bremer
WI Division
Phone: 608-829-7519
Fax: 608-829-7526
Email: William.bremer@fhwa.dot.gov


LTAP/TTAP Center Contacts - Updated 5/12/2006

http://www.ltapt2.org/centers/list.htm#LTAP/TTAP Center Contacts

Alabama - Alabama Technology Transfer Center, Department of Civil Engineering 238 Harbert Engineering Center, Auburn University, AL 36849-5337; Contact: Robert L. Vecellio; Telephone: (334) 844-4320; Fax: (334) 844-6290; E-mail: tsqjrmc@eng.auburn.edu; Web: http://www.AlabamaT2.org

Alaska - Alaska Transportation Technology Transfer, 2301 Peger Road, Fairbanks, AK 99709-5399; Contact: David Waldo; Telephone: (907) 451-5320; Fax: (907) 451-5340; E-mail: david_waldo@dot.state.ak.us; Web: http://www.dot.state.ak.us/stwddes/research/index.shtml

Arizona - Arizona LTAP, 1130 N 22 Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85009; Contact: Annie Parris; Telephone: (602) 712-8461; Fax: (602) 712-3007; E-mail: aparris@dot.state.az.us; Web: http://www.azltap.org

Arkansas - Arkansas Technology Transfer Program, PO Box 2261, Little Rock, AR 72203; Contact: Danny E. Moore; Telephone: (501) 569-2380; Fax: (501) 569-2070; E-mail: LTAP@AHTD.state.ar.us; Web: http://www.ahtd.state.ar.us/planning/T2/index.htm

California - California LTAP, Technology Transfer Program UC Berkeley RFS 1301 So. 46th St, Bldg 155, Richmond, CA 94804; Contact: Linda Howe-Steiger; Telephone: (510) 665-3410; Fax: (510) 665-3454; E-mail: lkhs@berkeley.edu; Web: http://www.techtransfer.berkeley.edu

Colorado - Colorado LTAP, University of Colorado at Boulder UCB 561, 3100 Marine Street, Boulder, CO 80309-0561; Contact: Renee Koller; Telephone: (303) 735-3530; Fax: (303) 735-2968; E-mail: cltap@colorado.edu; Web: http://ltap.colorado.edu

Connecticut - Connecticut Technology Transfer Center, Connecticut Transportation Institute University of Connecticut, Unit-5202, Storrs, CT 06269-5202; Contact: Donna Shea; Telephone: (860) 486-5400; Fax: (860) 486-2399; E-mail: shea@engr.uconn.edu; Web: http://www.t2center.uconn.edu/

Delaware - Delaware T2 Center, Delaware Center for Transportation 360 DuPont Hall, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716; Contact: Lawrence Klepner; Telephone: (302) 831- 6241; Fax: (302) 831-0674; E-mail: lklepner@ce.udel.edu; Web: http://www.ce.udel.edu/dct/

Florida - Florida Transportation Technology Transfer Center, University of Florida PO Box 116587, Gainesville, FL 32611-6587; Contact: Leslie D. Washburn; Telephone: (352) 392-2371; Fax: (352) 392- 3224; E-mail: t2@ce.ufl.edu; Web: http://t2.ce.ufl.edu

Georgia - Georgia Department of Transportation LTAP Center, 276 Memorial Drive SW, Atlanta, GA 30303; Contact: Dennis Rice; Telephone: (404) 656-4664; Fax: (404) 463-3564; E-mail: dennis.rice@dot.state.ga.us; Web: http://www.dot.state.ga.us/dot/osd/techtran/index.shtml

Hawaii - Hawaii Local Technical Assistance Program, University of Hawaii, Dept. of Civil Engineering 2540 Dole Street, Holmes Hall #383, Honolulu, HI 96822; Contact: Juli Kobayashi; Telephone: (808) 956-9006; Fax: (808) 956-8851; E-mail: juli@eng.hawaii.edu; Web: http://www.eng.hawaii.edu/~hltap

Idaho - Idaho Technology Transfer (T2) Center - LTAP, University of Idaho Engineering Physics Bldg 115F PO Box 440911, Moscow, ID 83844-0911; Contact: Douglas R. Moore; Telephone: (208) 885-4334; Fax: (208) 885- 2877; E-mail: idahot2@uidaho.edu; Web: http://www.webs1.uidaho.edu/idahot2/

Illinois - Illinois Technology Transfer Center, Illinois Department of Transportation 2300 S. Dirksen Parkway, Room 205, Springfield, IL 62764; Contact: Kevin Burke III; Telephone: (217) 785-5048; Fax: (217) 785-7296; E-mail: T2LRSDOT@dot.il.us; Web: http://www.dot.state.il.us/blr/t2center.html

Indiana - Indiana LTAP, 1435 Win Hentschel Blvd, Ste. B100, West Lafayette, IN 47906-4150; Contact: Thomas C. Martin; Telephone: (765) 494-2164; Fax: (765) 496-1176; E-mail: mondell@purdue.edu; Web: http://www.purdue.edu/INLTAP

Iowa - Iowa LTAP, Center for Transportation Research and Education (CTRE) Iowa State University Research Park 2901 S Loop Drive, Suite 3100, Ames, IA 50010-8632; Contact: Duane Smith; Telephone: (515) 294-8103; Fax: (515) 294-0467; E-mail: desmith@iastate.edu; Web: http://www.ctre.iastate.edu/ltap/

Kansas - Kansas University Transportation Center, 1530 W 15th St., 2160 Learned Hall, Lawrence, KS 66045; Contact: Tom Mulinazzi/Pat Weaver; Telephone: (785) 864-5658; Fax: (785) 864-3199; E-mail: kutc@ku.edu; Web: http://www.ksltap.kutc.ku.edu/

Kentucky - Kentucky Transportation Center, University of Kentucky 176 Raymond Building, Lexington, KY 40506-0281; Contact: Patsy Anderson; Telephone: (859) 257-4513; Fax: (859) 257-1061; E-mail: panderso@engr.uky.edu; Web: http://www.kyt2.com/

Louisiana - Louisiana LTAP Technology Transfer Center, 4101 Gourrier Avenue, Baton Rouge, LA 70808-4443; Contact: Marie B. Walsh; Telephone: (225) 767-9117; Fax: (225) 767-9156; E-mail: mbwalsh@ltrc.lsu.edu; Web: http://www.ltrc.lsu.edu/ltap.html

Maine - Maine Local Roads Center, Maine DOT Sta. 16, Community Services Division, Augusta, ME 04333-0016; Contact: Peter Coughlan; Telephone: (207) 624- 3270; Fax: (207) 624-3301; E-mail: local.web@maine.gov; Web: http://www.state.me.us/mdot/mlrc/mlrc-home.php

Maryland - Maryland Transportation Technology Transfer Center, Bldg 806, #3102, College Park, MD 20742; Contact: Phillip Tarnoff; Telephone: (301) 403-4623; Fax: (301) 403-4591; E-mail: ttc@eng.umd.edu; Web: http://www.ence.umd.edu/mdt2center/index.htm

Massachusetts - Baystate Roads Program - Massachusetts, UMass Transportation Center Marston Hall 214, Amherst, MA 01003-5205; Contact: Christopher J. Ahmadjian; Telephone: (413) 545-2604; Fax: (413) 545-6471; E-mail: ahmadjia@ecs.umass.edu; Web: http://www.ecs.umass.edu/baystate_roads/

Michigan - Michigan Local Technical Assistance Program, 309 Grover C. Dillman Hall 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931-1295; Contact: Terry McNinch; Telephone: (906) 487-2102; Fax: (906) 487-3409; E-mail: ltap@mtu.edu; Web: http://www.MichiganLTAP.org

Minnesota - Minnesota LTAP, Center for Transportation Studies 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455; Contact: Jim Grothaus; Telephone: (612) 625-1813; Fax: (612) 625-6381; E-mail: jones154@cts.umn.edu; jgrothaus@cts.umn.edu; Web: http://www.mnltap.umn.edu

Mississippi - Mississippi Center for Technology Transfer, PO Box 18125 Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217-0625; Contact: Ivory L. Williams; Telephone: (601) 979-2339; Fax: (601) 979-3703; E-mail: tsquare@jsums.edu; Web: http://www.jsums.edu/~tsquare/

Missouri - Missouri Local Transportation Resource Center, 710 University Drive, Suite 121, Rolla, MO 65401; Contact: Robin Wilson; Telephone: (866) MO-ROADS; Fax: (573) 341-7245; E-mail: mltrc@umr.edu; Web: http://campus.umr.edu/mltrc

Montana - Montana Local Technical Assistance Program, PO Box 173910, Bozeman, MT 59717-3910; Contact: Lois Evans; Telephone: (800) 541-6671; Fax: (406) 994-5333; E-mail: MTLTAP@coe.montana.edu; Web: http://www.coe.montana.edu/ltap/

Nebraska - Nebraska Local Technical Assistance Program (NE LTAP)3921 West Craw Street, Lincoln, NE 68524; Contact: Daniel R. Cady; Telephone: (402) 472-5748; Fax: (402) 472-0685; E-mail: ne-ltap@unl.edu; Web: http://www.ne-ltap.unl.edu

Nevada - Nevada Transportation Technology Transfer Center, Nevada T2 Center/257 University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557; Contact: Maria Ardila-Coulson; Telephone: (775) 784-1433; Fax: (775) 784- 1429; E-mail: ardilaco@unr.nevada.edu; Web: http://www.t2.unr.edu/

New Hampshire - University of New Hampshire Technology Transfer Center, 33 College Road, Durham, NH 03824-3591; Contact: Kathy L. DesRoches; Telephone: (603) 862-2826; Fax: (603) 862-2364; E- mail: t2.center@unh.edu; Web: http://www.t2.unh.edu

New Jersey - Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Technology - LTAP, CAIT-LTAP Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey 93 Road One, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8014; Contact: Janet Leli; Telephone: (732) 445-5236; Fax: (732) 445-5636; E- mail: jleli@rci.rutgers.edu; Web: http://www.ltap.rutgers.edu/

New Mexico - New Mexico LTAP, PO Box 1149, Santa Fe, NM 87504-1149; Contact: Lee Cabeza de Vaca; Telephone: (505) 827-5267; Fax: (505) 827-5550; E-mail: lee.cabezadevaca@nmshtd.state.nm.us; Web: http://www.nmshtd.state.nm.us/main.asp?secid=1143_3

New York - Cornell Local Roads Program (New York LTAP)416 Riley-Robb Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701; Contact: Lynne H. Irwin; Telephone: (607) 255-8033; Fax: (607) 255-4080; E-mail: clrp@cornell.edu; Web: http://www.clrp.cornell.edu/

North Carolina - North Carolina LTAP, ITRE at NC State University Campus Box 8601, Raleigh, NC 27695-8601; Contact: Linda Collier; Telephone: (919) 515-8899; Fax: (919) 515-8897; E-mail: jbm@unity.ncsu.edu, linda_collier@ncsu.edu, ronnie_williams@ncsu.edu; Web: http://itre.ncsu.edu/LTAP/

North Dakota - North Dakota LTAP Transportation Technology Transfer LTAP Center, Civil/ Industrial Eng Bldg, Rm 201H College of Eng/Arch, Civil Engineering Division North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105; Contact: Donald A. Andersen; Telephone: (701) 231-7051, (800) 726-4143, Bismarck: (701) 328-2658; Fax: (701) 231-6185 Bismarck: (701) 328-0103; E-mail: Donald.Andersen@ndsu.nodak.edu; Web: http://www.ce.ndsu.nodak.edu/ndltap

Ohio - The Ohio LTAP Center, 1980 W. Broad Street, 2nd Floor, Columbus, OH 43223; Contact: Sarah Welsh; Telephone: (877) 800-0031; Fax: (614) 466-2120; E-mail: sarah.welsh@dot.state.oh.us; Web: http://www.dot.state.oh.us/LTAP/

Oklahoma - Oklahoma Center for Local Government Technology, Oklahoma State University 200 Cordell North, Stillwater, OK 74078-8808; Contact: Doug Wright; Telephone: (405) 744-6049; Fax: (405) 744- 7268; E-mail: wright@okstate.edu; Web: http://clgt.okstate.edu/ltap.htm

Oregon - Oregon Technology Transfer Center, 200 Hawthorne SE, Suite B-240, Salem, OR 97301-5192; Contact: Bob Raths; Telephone: (503) 986-2855; Fax: (503) 986-2844; E-mail: bob.raths@odot.state.or.us; Web: http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/TD/TP_T2/

Pennsylvania - Pennsylvania Local Roads Program, Pennsylvania Dept. of Transportation- Bureau of Planning and Research 400 North St., 6th Floor, Harrisburg, PA 17120-0064; Contact: Kim Ferroni; Telephone: (717) 214-8685; Fax: (717) 783-9152; E-mail: kferroni@state.pa.us; Web: https://www.ltap.state.pa.us

Puerto Rico - Puerto Rico Transportation Technology Transfer Center, Civil Engineering Department PO Box 9041, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, Mayaquez, PR 00681-9041; Contact: Gisela Gonzalez; Telephone: (787) 834-6385; Fax: (787) 265-5695; E-mail: gisela_1956@hotmail.com; Web: http://www.uprm.edu/prt2

Rhode Island - Rhode Island Technology Transfer Center, The University of Rhode Island Transportation Center 75 Lower College Road, Carlotti Administration Building, Kingston, RI 02881; Contact: Jeff Cathcart; Telephone: (401) 874-9405; Fax: (401) 874-2297; E-mail: cathcart@etal.uri.edu; Web: http://www.uritc.uri.edu/t2center/

South Carolina - South Carolina Transportation Technology Transfer Service, Civil Engineering Dept. 114 Lowry Hall, Clemson, SC 29634-0911; Contact: Sandra Priddy; Telephone: (864) 656-1456; Fax: (864) 656-2670; E-mail: t3s@ces.clemson.edu; Web: http://www.ces.clemson.edu/t3s/

South Dakota - South Dakota Local Transportation Assistance Program, Box 2220, SDSU, Harding Hall, Brookings, SD 57007-0199; Contact: Ali A. Selim; Telephone: (605) 688-4185; Fax: (605) 688- 5880; E-mail: SDSU_SDLTAP@sdstate.edu; Web: http://sdltap.sdstate.edu/

Tennessee - Tennessee Transportation Assistance Program (TTAP)309 Conference Center Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-4133; Contact: Dr. David B. Clarke; Telephone: (865) 974-5255; Fax: (865) 974- 3889; E-mail: ttap@utk.edu; Web: http://ctr.utk.edu/ttap/default.html

Texas - Texas Local Technical Assistance Program, Engineering, Utilities and Public Works Training Institute Texas Engineering Extension Service 301 Tarrow, College Station, TX 77840-7896; Contact: Howard McCann; Telephone: (979) 458-1249; Fax: (979) 862- 2803; E-mail: Howard.McCann@teexmail.tamu.edu; Web: http://teexcit.tamu.edu/texasltap/

Utah - Utah LTAP Center, Utah State University 4111 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4111; Contact: Doyt Y. Bolling or Keri Shoemaker; Telephone: (435) 797-2931; Fax: (435) 797-1582; E-mail: utaht2@cc.usu.edu; Web: http://www.utaht2.usu.edu/

Vermont - Vermont Local Roads Program, Saint Michael's College One Winooski Park, Box 260, Colchester, VT 05439; Contact: Henry R. Lambert; Telephone: (802) 654-2652; Fax: (802) 654-2555; E-mail: hlambert@smcvt.edu; Web: http://personalweb.smcvt.edu/vermontlocalroads/welcome.htm

Virginia - Virginia Transportation Technology Transfer Center, 1230 Cedars Court, Suite B, Charlottesville, VA 22903; Contact: Russ Neyman; Telephone: (434) 293-1966; Fax: (434) 293-1429; E-mail: vtttc@VirginiaDOT.org; Web: http://www.vtrc.net/vtttc/

Washington - Washington State Technology Transfer Center (WST2)WSDOT - H&LP PO Box 47390, Olympia, WA 98504-7390; Contact: Lawrence Schofield, P.E.Telephone: (360) 705-7386; Fax: (360) 705-6858; E-mail: wst2center@wsdot.wa.gov; Web: http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/localprograms/ltap/

West Virginia - West Virginia Transportation Technology Transfer Center, PO Box 6103, Morgantown, WV 26506-6103; Contact: Mike Blankenship; Telephone: (304) 293-3031, ext. 2612 or 2629; Fax: (304) 293-7109; E-mail: michael.blankenship@mail.wvu.edu; Web: http://wvltap.wvu.edu

Wisconsin - Wisconsin Transportation Information Center, University of Wisconsin- Madison 432 N. Lake Street, Madison, WI 53706; Contact: Don Walker; Telephone: (800) 442-4615; Fax: (608) 263-3160; E- mail: walker@epd.engr.wisc.edu; Web: http://epd.engr.wisc.edu/centers/tic/

Wyoming - Wyoming Technology Transfer Center (WyT2/LTAP)University of Wyoming 1000 E University Ave, Dept 3295 Engineering Bldg, Room 2094, Laramie, WY 82071; Contact: Khaled Ksaibati; Telephone: (307) 766-6743; Fax: (307) 766-6784; E-mail: khaled@uwyo.edu; Web: http://.wwweng.uwyo.edu/wyt2

Tribal Technical Assistance Program (TTAP) Centers

TTAP-Alaska - Alaska Tribal Technical Assistance Program, NW & AK TTAP 329 Harbor Dr. #208, Sitka, AK 99835; Contact: Dan Moreno; Telephone: (800) 399-6376; Fax: (907) 747-5032; E- mail: dmoreno@mail.ewu.edu; Web: http://www.ewu.edu/TTAP

TTAP-California - TTAP-California-Nevada, The National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development 11138 Valley Mall, Suite 200, El Monte, CA 91731; Contact: Lee Bigwater; Telephone: (626) 350-4446; Fax: (626) 442- 7115

TTAP-Colorado - Tribal Technical Assistance Program at Colorado State University, Rockwell Hall, Rm. 321 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1276; Contact: Ronald Hall; Telephone: (800) 262-7623; Fax: (970) 491-3502; E-mail: ronald.hall@colostate.edu; Web: http://ttap.colostate.edu/

TTAP-Michigan - Tribal Technical Assistance Program (TTAP)TTAP/301-E Dillman Hall Michigan Technological University 1400 Townsend Dr, Houghton, MI 49931-1295; Contact: Bernard D. Alkire; Telephone: (888) 230-0688; Fax: (906) 487-1834; E-mail: balkire@mtu.edu; Web: http://www.ttap.mtu.edu

TTAP-North Dakota - Northern Plains Tribal Technical Assistance Program, United Tribes Technical College 3315 University Drive, Bismarck, ND 58504; Contact: Dennis Trusty; Telephone: (701) 255-3285 ext. 1262; Fax: (701) 530-0635; E-mail: nddennis@hotmail.com or dtrusty@uttc.edu; Web: http://www.uttc.edu/organizations/ttap/ttap.asp

TTAP-NW - Northwest Tribal Technical Assistance Program, Eastern Washington University Department of Urban Planning, Public & Health Administration 216 Isle Hall, Cheney, WA 99004; Contact: David Frey; Telephone: (800) 583-3187; Fax: (509) 359-7485; E-mail: rrolland@ewu.edu; Web: www.ewu.edu/TTA

TTAP-Oklahoma - Tribal Technical Assistance Program at Oklahoma State University, 200 Cordell North, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-8808; Contact: James Self; Telephone: (405) 744- 6049; Fax: (405) 744-7268; E-mail: selfjt@okstate.edu; Web: http://clgt.okstate.edu/tribal.htm


National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER)

Source: www.nccer.org

The National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) education foundation founded in 1995 by 11 of the world's largest and most progressive construction companies and national construction associations. NCCER was created to address the severe workforce shortage facing our industry and to develop standardized construction, maintenance and pipeline curricula. Today, NCCER is supported by hundreds of leading construction companies, manufacturers and national trade associations.

Mission

to assure that industry clients receive quality services and industry workers have rewarding, progressive careers, NCCER provides world-class craft training materials, opportunities for leadership growth, and effective safety training that will enhance productivity, cost-effectiveness, and the image of the construction and maintenance industry.

Partners
  • American Fire Sprinkler Association
  • American Petroleum Institute
  • American Society for Training & Development
  • American Welding Society
  • Associated Builders & Contractors, Inc.
  • ABC Texas Gulf Coast Chapter
  • Associated General Contractors of America
  • Association for Career and Technical Education
  • Carolinas AGC, Inc.
  • Citizens Development Corps
  • Construction Industry Institute
  • Construction Users Roundtable
  • Design Build Institute of America
  • Electronic Systems Industry Consortium
  • Merit Contractors Association of Canada
  • Metal Building Manufacturers Association
  • National Association of Minority Contractors
  • National Association of State Supervisors for Trade and Industrial Education
  • National Association of Women in Construction
  • National Insulation Association
  • National Ready Mixed Concrete Association
  • National Systems Contractors Association
  • National Technical Honor Society
  • National Utility Contractors Association
  • North American Crane Bureau
  • North American Technician Excellence
  • Painting & Decorating Contractors of America
  • Portland Cement Association
  • Skills
  • Steel Erectors Association of America
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • University of Florida
  • Women Construction Owners & Executives, USA